FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

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This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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Not For Profit - For Global Justice and The Fight to End Violence & Hunger world wide - Since 1999
"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

This is the callout,This is the call to the Patriots,To stand up for all the ones who’ve been thrown away,This is the call to the all citizens ,Stand up!
Stand up and protect those who can not protect themselves our veterans ,the homeless & the forgotten take back our world today

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Become A Supporting member of humanity to help end hunger and violence in our country,You have a right to live. You have a right to be. You have these rights regardless of money, health, social status, or class. You have these rights, man, woman, or child. These rights can never be taken away from you, they can only be infringed. When someone violates your rights, remember, it is not your fault.,


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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”

STEALING FROM THE CITIZENRY

Imagine that you have no home

Imagine that you have no home




Imagine that you have no home, and you are literally living on the streets. Your only belongings are the things you can cram into a backpack. With no pillow to lay your head on, you sleep on cardboard, and if you are fortunate, you may have a blanket. If not, then you cover up with plastic trash bags to try to keep warm in cold temperatures. You sleep with as many layers of clothes as you can. A change of clothing is not much of an option due to the very few pieces you own. You scrounge food wherever you can find any – maybe in a dumpster. Your only shelter from the elements is the bridge above you, or maybe the streets above if you live underground on Lower Wacker Drive.

Veteransproject Joseph Barber, a Army veteran, has been delivering sandwiches to the homeless in some very rough areas of our country, for  years.
The smell of urine and feces lingers in the air, along with the body odor of other homeless people, but by now you have become accustomed to these pungent odors. Your only form of transportation is by foot, which becomes difficult as the worn-out shoes give way to the cold, and your feet become numb.

You look forward to Sundays  & Wensdays because of a truck that comes downtown to deliver sack lunches with two lunchmeat sandwiches in each paper bag. A drink and a couple of snacks are also included. Even though you may have to walk many blocks to get to the truck, it is well worth it to get such a hearty lunch, since it may be the only real meal you get until next week.

Veteransproject Joseph Barber, a Army veteran, has been delivering sandwiches to the homeless in some very rough areas  Volunteers help, as they spend Saturdays packing the brown paper bags and organizing clothing, and making toiletry kits to pass out on the food run and know building their urban survival packs for those on the streets of America.

Sundays begin with making the sandwiches, and packing them in the prepared paper bags. Then the shelves in the box truck are loaded, and the run begins.
At some of the stops, the homeless were lined up 50 to 60 deep, in single file, as they inched forward to get a lunch from the volunteers who passed out the lunches from the back of the truck.

In many cases today it is illegal to feed  your fellow countrymen & women Call it extreme but Veteransproject nor it founder will follow such laws and will not be told who they can love or break bread with the lordb guides our heart nort men

As we neared the end of our run, the numbers of people needing a lunch kept growing, and by the end of the night we had handed out lunches to over 400 people.
Some of our stops were quick, as Suzanne would stop and someone would get out and run a lunch to someone on a street corner. At each stop, along with the lunch, coffee or juice was served, and jackets, coats, socks, and blankets were handed out. I saw mothers and daughters, young couples, and many who had been living on the streets for years.Doc (aka) Joseph knows so many of these people by name, and remembers them from the first time he met them even years ago.

As we neared the end of our run, the numbers of people needing a lunch kept growing, and by the end of the night we had handed out lunches to over 600 people. In addition to passing out the lunches, we went to the Pacific Garden Mission where we served hot meals to hundreds of people in an hour’s time.

This makes me realize just how much I have to be thankful for. 

Two of my children have gone with me on this run, and the sight of all the desperate and needy people brought tears to our eyes. You can’t even begin to imagine how thankful these people are just to get a simple sack lunch, and how much they count on it each Sunday. No matter how difficult our situations may be, or how much we may struggle, we have no idea how much we take for granted.

In spite of the struggles I face, nothing compares to what the homeless face day after day. It was so rewarding to be able to give something to others, and to know that they appreciated it so much.

I felt a sense of guilt for all the times I have complained about things, yet at the same time I felt a sense of pride, knowing I was able to reach out and greet these people with a smile, a handshake, and a lunch

We get so wrapped up in having the nicest house, car, and the latest technology, but after spending a day driving the streets of inner-city Chicago, and seeing so many people curled up on the sidewalks, covered in plastic bags just to stay warm, it’s easy to see just how great my life is compared to what these people suffer day to day just to keep warm and have something to eat.
I felt a sense of guilt for all the times I have complained about things, yet at the same time I felt a sense of pride, knowing I was able to reach out and greet these people with a smile, a handshake, and a lunch – as they would smile back and say thank you. These people are so grateful. They count on Doc and his crew to be there every Sunday. I believe that they anticipate the lunches, but even more, they look forward to the handshake, the smile, the encouragement, and the hope that Doc and his crew deliver.

I worry about who will take over when Doc is no longer able to do this. I don’t know many people who would be willing to sacrifice every weekend or their time to prepare and deliver these much-needed lunches and other items. I hope that someone will have the willingness and dedication to carry on this huge and important undertaking and show of love and compassion I have seen in few through out my life  and that this service will grow and grow.


Veteransproject Manager Suzanne D Button

Imagine that you have no home




Imagine that you have no home, and you are literally living on the streets. Your only belongings are the things you can cram into a backpack. With no pillow to lay your head on, you sleep on cardboard, and if you are fortunate, you may have a blanket. If not, then you cover up with plastic trash bags to try to keep warm in cold temperatures. You sleep with as many layers of clothes as you can. A change of clothing is not much of an option due to the very few pieces you own. You scrounge food wherever you can find any – maybe in a dumpster. Your only shelter from the elements is the bridge above you, or maybe the streets above if you live underground on Lower Wacker Drive.

Veteransproject Joseph Barber, a Army veteran, has been delivering sandwiches to the homeless in some very rough areas of our country, for  years.
The smell of urine and feces lingers in the air, along with the body odor of other homeless people, but by now you have become accustomed to these pungent odors. Your only form of transportation is by foot, which becomes difficult as the worn-out shoes give way to the cold, and your feet become numb.

You look forward to Sundays  & Wensdays because of a truck that comes downtown to deliver sack lunches with two lunchmeat sandwiches in each paper bag. A drink and a couple of snacks are also included. Even though you may have to walk many blocks to get to the truck, it is well worth it to get such a hearty lunch, since it may be the only real meal you get until next week.

Veteransproject Joseph Barber, a Army veteran, has been delivering sandwiches to the homeless in some very rough areas  Volunteers help, as they spend Saturdays packing the brown paper bags and organizing clothing, and making toiletry kits to pass out on the food run and know building their urban survival packs for those on the streets of America.

Sundays begin with making the sandwiches, and packing them in the prepared paper bags. Then the shelves in the box truck are loaded, and the run begins.
At some of the stops, the homeless were lined up 50 to 60 deep, in single file, as they inched forward to get a lunch from the volunteers who passed out the lunches from the back of the truck.

In many cases today it is illegal to feed  your fellow countrymen & women Call it extreme but Veteransproject nor it founder will follow such laws and will not be told who they can love or break bread with the lordb guides our heart nort men

As we neared the end of our run, the numbers of people needing a lunch kept growing, and by the end of the night we had handed out lunches to over 400 people.
Some of our stops were quick, as Suzanne would stop and someone would get out and run a lunch to someone on a street corner. At each stop, along with the lunch, coffee or juice was served, and jackets, coats, socks, and blankets were handed out. I saw mothers and daughters, young couples, and many who had been living on the streets for years.Doc (aka) Joseph knows so many of these people by name, and remembers them from the first time he met them even years ago.

As we neared the end of our run, the numbers of people needing a lunch kept growing, and by the end of the night we had handed out lunches to over 600 people. In addition to passing out the lunches, we went to the Pacific Garden Mission where we served hot meals to hundreds of people in an hour’s time.

This makes me realize just how much I have to be thankful for. 

Two of my children have gone with me on this run, and the sight of all the desperate and needy people brought tears to our eyes. You can’t even begin to imagine how thankful these people are just to get a simple sack lunch, and how much they count on it each Sunday. No matter how difficult our situations may be, or how much we may struggle, we have no idea how much we take for granted.

In spite of the struggles I face, nothing compares to what the homeless face day after day. It was so rewarding to be able to give something to others, and to know that they appreciated it so much.

I felt a sense of guilt for all the times I have complained about things, yet at the same time I felt a sense of pride, knowing I was able to reach out and greet these people with a smile, a handshake, and a lunch

We get so wrapped up in having the nicest house, car, and the latest technology, but after spending a day driving the streets of inner-city Chicago, and seeing so many people curled up on the sidewalks, covered in plastic bags just to stay warm, it’s easy to see just how great my life is compared to what these people suffer day to day just to keep warm and have something to eat.
I felt a sense of guilt for all the times I have complained about things, yet at the same time I felt a sense of pride, knowing I was able to reach out and greet these people with a smile, a handshake, and a lunch – as they would smile back and say thank you. These people are so grateful. They count on Doc and his crew to be there every Sunday. I believe that they anticipate the lunches, but even more, they look forward to the handshake, the smile, the encouragement, and the hope that Doc and his crew deliver.

I worry about who will take over when Doc is no longer able to do this. I don’t know many people who would be willing to sacrifice every weekend or their time to prepare and deliver these much-needed lunches and other items. I hope that someone will have the willingness and dedication to carry on this huge and important undertaking and show of love and compassion I have seen in few through out my life  and that this service will grow and grow.


Veteransproject Manager Suzanne D Button


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