FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

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This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

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The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Friday, March 25, 2016

A Man Worth His Salt

Remembering what my beloved mentor taught me, I resolved to be what Job was

A Man Worth His Salt


Sooner or later, braggarts are brought low, as I once learned when I boasted to my college students that I made it through winter without even so much as a head cold. Bam! The next morning I awoke feeling terrible.
After his examination, my doctor said, “You’re suffering from a virus with flu-like symptoms — chills, fever, scratchy throat, coughing, clogged sinus cavities, and watery eyes. Take antibiotics, drink plenty of fluids, and rest.”
As I lay in bed, absolutely miserable, I developed another symptom: the woe-is-me syndrome. In my daily morning prayers, I always ask God to let me make it through the ongoing semester without illness, and here I was, sick, missing work.
In the depths of self-pity and viewing myself as an object of unjust suffering, I was disappointed in God because He didn’t answer my prayers.
I thought about one of the many lessons taught to me by my boyhood best friend and mentor, Jaybird, who loved stories about Biblical characters, of whom Job was one of his favorites. A master storyteller, the old black man retold tales he’d heard in his own inimitable way. I’ll never forget his yarn about Job.
“If a man is worth his salt and trusts the Lord, he don’t never feel sorry for hisself. Take Job, for instance. One day, God told Satan that Job was a man of faith and wouldn’t never let the devil shake that faith.
Satan argued that the only reason Job held his faith was because he had a big family, lots o’ land, and plenty o’ money. Satan bet God that if these blessings was taken from him, he’d abandon his faith.
“Seein’ an opportunity to teach his chillun about the evils o’ self-pity, God let Satan strip Job o’ all he held dear. His chillun died, and he lost his cattle and land.
“Facin’ such a calamity, most folks would’ve turned to beggin’ forgiveness for their sins, hopin’ that God would relieve them o’ misery. 

“Not Job — he trusted his Maker. He hadn’t committed no sins worthy of such suffering, and ’fessin’ up to wrongful deeds he never had done would prove he didn’t have faith.
“It wasn’t so much the patience o’ Job as much as it was his strength to endure the hard times. And it paid off. Job’s story ended happily: God rewarded him with a new family, more camels and sheep than he had before, and twice as much land.
“ You see … Job had a job to do: He had to hold on to his faith. He suffered sumpin’ terrible, but never stopped lovin’ the Lord. He was a man worth his salt.”
Reflecting on my beloved mentor’s story, I realized that sickness, like health, is part of human existence, an annealing experience that tests one’s tenacity and endurance, thereby making those virtues — as well as one’s faith — stronger.
Remembering what my beloved mentor taught me, I resolved to be what Job was: a man worth his salt.

Remembering what my beloved mentor taught me, I resolved to be what Job was

A Man Worth His Salt


Sooner or later, braggarts are brought low, as I once learned when I boasted to my college students that I made it through winter without even so much as a head cold. Bam! The next morning I awoke feeling terrible.
After his examination, my doctor said, “You’re suffering from a virus with flu-like symptoms — chills, fever, scratchy throat, coughing, clogged sinus cavities, and watery eyes. Take antibiotics, drink plenty of fluids, and rest.”
As I lay in bed, absolutely miserable, I developed another symptom: the woe-is-me syndrome. In my daily morning prayers, I always ask God to let me make it through the ongoing semester without illness, and here I was, sick, missing work.
In the depths of self-pity and viewing myself as an object of unjust suffering, I was disappointed in God because He didn’t answer my prayers.
I thought about one of the many lessons taught to me by my boyhood best friend and mentor, Jaybird, who loved stories about Biblical characters, of whom Job was one of his favorites. A master storyteller, the old black man retold tales he’d heard in his own inimitable way. I’ll never forget his yarn about Job.
“If a man is worth his salt and trusts the Lord, he don’t never feel sorry for hisself. Take Job, for instance. One day, God told Satan that Job was a man of faith and wouldn’t never let the devil shake that faith.
Satan argued that the only reason Job held his faith was because he had a big family, lots o’ land, and plenty o’ money. Satan bet God that if these blessings was taken from him, he’d abandon his faith.
“Seein’ an opportunity to teach his chillun about the evils o’ self-pity, God let Satan strip Job o’ all he held dear. His chillun died, and he lost his cattle and land.
“Facin’ such a calamity, most folks would’ve turned to beggin’ forgiveness for their sins, hopin’ that God would relieve them o’ misery. 

“Not Job — he trusted his Maker. He hadn’t committed no sins worthy of such suffering, and ’fessin’ up to wrongful deeds he never had done would prove he didn’t have faith.
“It wasn’t so much the patience o’ Job as much as it was his strength to endure the hard times. And it paid off. Job’s story ended happily: God rewarded him with a new family, more camels and sheep than he had before, and twice as much land.
“ You see … Job had a job to do: He had to hold on to his faith. He suffered sumpin’ terrible, but never stopped lovin’ the Lord. He was a man worth his salt.”
Reflecting on my beloved mentor’s story, I realized that sickness, like health, is part of human existence, an annealing experience that tests one’s tenacity and endurance, thereby making those virtues — as well as one’s faith — stronger.
Remembering what my beloved mentor taught me, I resolved to be what Job was: a man worth his salt.


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