FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

Joseph F Barber | Create Your Badge
This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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TOOL REPLACEMENT FUND

Help launch this campaign and become the first donor. WE HAVE HAD ALL OUR TOOLS STOLEN FROM US AND THEY ARE UNRECOVERABLE AND IT IS VITAL TO OUR EFFORTS THATY THESES TOOLS BE REPLACED ,THEY ARE THE MAIN SOURCE OF OUR REVENUE THAT SUPPORTS OUR EFFORTS TO HELP FEED HOUSE VETERANS & CITIZENS ALIKE

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Not For Profit - For Global Justice and The Fight to End Violence & Hunger world wide - Since 1999
"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

This is the callout,This is the call to the Patriots,To stand up for all the ones who’ve been thrown away,This is the call to the all citizens ,Stand up!
Stand up and protect those who can not protect themselves our veterans ,the homeless & the forgotten take back our world today


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Become A Supporting member of humanity to help end hunger and violence in our country,You have a right to live. You have a right to be. You have these rights regardless of money, health, social status, or class. You have these rights, man, woman, or child. These rights can never be taken away from you, they can only be infringed. When someone violates your rights, remember, it is not your fault.,


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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

STEALING FROM THE CITIZENRY

The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

America’s Addiction to Pleasure Harms Marriage and Family

America’s Addiction to Pleasure Harms Marriage and Family



Every once in a while a little ditty from an old Robert Palmer song begins rumbling though my head: "...might as well face it you’re addicted to love".

As an attorney who has dabbled in family law, and a former prosecutor, it often strikes me that this ditty doesn’t apply to a substantial chunk of people in the U.S. In fact, America as a nation doesn’t seem all that enamored with the idea of love anymore -- at least not the highest form of love, that which sustains marriage and families.
For those who might think otherwise, I’d suggest they look at the latest numbers regarding marriage and family. Both institutions remain in serious decline: The percentage of married households in the U.S. has now dipped to an all-time low. (2010 was the first year in our history that fewer than half of all households were married households.)  And the rate of newly formed marriages has hovered near its all-time low for several years. America doesn’t seem to care much for children anymore, either. Our birth rate has also hovered near an all-time low for several years. Four out of every ten of those record-low births are out-of-wedlock -- and one in three children grows up in a household without a father.
No, Americans are not addicted to love. If anything, too many of us are addicted to pleasure. And here’s the problem. We can’t have it both ways. Granted, many factors have contributed to the decline of marriage and family in the U.S, but one underlying factor is frequently overlooked: America’s obsession with pleasurable indulgence. Marriage and family will inevitably decline in a society of too many self-absorbed pleasure junkies, which is basically what we’ve become.

The selfless, sacrificial love that’s necessary to sustain marriage and families involves doing the difficult -- whether one feels like it or not: foregoing one’s self-interest for others; compromising with others; and putting children's interests ahead of one’s own. But pleasure junkies have conditioned themselves to do the opposite. They’re accustomed to doing the easy things (e.g. overeating, overspending, smoking, viewing pornography), and focusing on themselves, rather than doing difficult things for others or for a greater common good.
Pleasure, of course, is not intrinsically bad or evil. In fact, it’s an important aspect of a balanced life. But here’s the problem: indulgence in pleasure has become the central focus of life, even an addiction, for far too many of us. America’s entertainment and advertising industries have spent billions of dollars making pleasure into a god. And too many have opted to worship at that altar.

Examples abound. Just look at what -- and how much -- Americans eat and drink. Too many of us can’t seem to stop eating salty, fatty, and sugary foods. Our stomach says Stop, I’m full, but we say, Shut up, I want to keep experiencing pleasure. So we keep eating and overeating and putting on weight. Eventually, our desire for physical activity fades because it becomes too difficult. 

The same holds for drinking habits. Americans love super-sized sodas and juice drinks loaded with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and addictive sugar substitutes. So we make sure they’re everywhere: at fast food and chain restaurants, at sporting events, in vending machines at school, and in shopping establishments.
It’s no wonder we’ve developed an obesity epidemic. Today, over one third of American adults are considered to be obese -- more than double the number of 45 years ago. Our national genetics haven’t changed; our eating and drinking habits have.

We don’t fare much better in the area of personal spending and debt, either. Too many Americans have grown soft and self-indulgent when it comes to materialism and personal finances. We love to buy stuff. It’s pleasurable: jewelry, clothes, electronics, shoes, weekend getaways, tickets to sporting events, a big tab at a nice restaurant, a trip abroad.

Too many buy and buy, and run up debt. Many with good incomes can’t afford a down payment on a house or put money into a retirement account. Others borrow from friends or relatives, lacking a sense of peace about their current or future finances.

America’s personal bottom lines have become rather unseemly. Consumer debt (non-real estate) has more than tripled in the past 50 years. Today, a quarter of Americans have more money in credit card debt than they have in available savings to pay off that debt.

Unfortunately, our overindulgence in pleasure doesn’t stop at eating, drinking, and spending. Millions are battling substance abuse and/or alcoholism. Millions more struggle with smoking, gambling, hard and soft-core pornography, video games, prescription drugs, and other addictive products and behaviors.

Many people fail to connect the dots between our addiction to pleasure on the one hand, and the decline of American marriage and family on the other. But the connection is real. Commonsense tells us so. Before the No Pain, No Gain mantra seized the world of personal fitness, my folks used to counsel me with a similar adage: Little Effort, Little Results. The phrase was commonplace during my teen and young adulthood years, and it wasn't restricted to my school or work life. It applied to my personal life as well.

When it came to marriage and family, my parents thankfully didn’t preach much; instead they taught by example. I watched them do the difficult things necessary to make their marriage work. They spent a good chunk of time communicating, often spending time at night listening to each other’s concerns, ideas, or hopes. One or both might not have felt like listening, but it was important enough to the other -- so they routinely sacrificed TV time, reading time, hobby time, and relaxation to talk and listen.

When there were points of disagreement (there often were), each was willing to compromise to some degree for the other -- even though neither of them felt like compromising (about spending habits, weekend plans, projects around the house, family gatherings, etc.).

They made similar sacrifices for me and my siblings. Good parents know that raising children requires tremendous self-giving and sacrifice. There’s less sleep, flexibility, time, money, and energy to do just about everything a couple wants to do for themselves.

Indulgence in pleasure takes very little willpower. A lack of willpower to do what’s difficult, and focus on self, are hardly the habits one can afford to bring into long-term relationships, particularly marriage and family relations. Like eating a good diet, exercise, or saving money -- marriage and family involve persistent effort and sacrifice. Nowadays, large numbers of Americans seem ill-prepared to undergo this sacrifice and effort. We’ve slouched into a society of too many self-indulgent individualists, concerned primarily with our own hedonism and pleasure.
Many if not most of America’s ongoing ills can be tied to the decline of marriage and family: poverty, dependency, welfare, crime -- insolvency of Social Security and Medicare due to low birth rates. If Americans continue their attachment to doing the easy things for themselves, and don’t reclaim the mantle of effort and sacrifice for others in relationships, then marriage and family will continue to weaken, and that once great civilization, America, will continue to weaken along with them.

By J.G. Maggio

America’s Addiction to Pleasure Harms Marriage and Family



Every once in a while a little ditty from an old Robert Palmer song begins rumbling though my head: "...might as well face it you’re addicted to love".

As an attorney who has dabbled in family law, and a former prosecutor, it often strikes me that this ditty doesn’t apply to a substantial chunk of people in the U.S. In fact, America as a nation doesn’t seem all that enamored with the idea of love anymore -- at least not the highest form of love, that which sustains marriage and families.
For those who might think otherwise, I’d suggest they look at the latest numbers regarding marriage and family. Both institutions remain in serious decline: The percentage of married households in the U.S. has now dipped to an all-time low. (2010 was the first year in our history that fewer than half of all households were married households.)  And the rate of newly formed marriages has hovered near its all-time low for several years. America doesn’t seem to care much for children anymore, either. Our birth rate has also hovered near an all-time low for several years. Four out of every ten of those record-low births are out-of-wedlock -- and one in three children grows up in a household without a father.
No, Americans are not addicted to love. If anything, too many of us are addicted to pleasure. And here’s the problem. We can’t have it both ways. Granted, many factors have contributed to the decline of marriage and family in the U.S, but one underlying factor is frequently overlooked: America’s obsession with pleasurable indulgence. Marriage and family will inevitably decline in a society of too many self-absorbed pleasure junkies, which is basically what we’ve become.

The selfless, sacrificial love that’s necessary to sustain marriage and families involves doing the difficult -- whether one feels like it or not: foregoing one’s self-interest for others; compromising with others; and putting children's interests ahead of one’s own. But pleasure junkies have conditioned themselves to do the opposite. They’re accustomed to doing the easy things (e.g. overeating, overspending, smoking, viewing pornography), and focusing on themselves, rather than doing difficult things for others or for a greater common good.
Pleasure, of course, is not intrinsically bad or evil. In fact, it’s an important aspect of a balanced life. But here’s the problem: indulgence in pleasure has become the central focus of life, even an addiction, for far too many of us. America’s entertainment and advertising industries have spent billions of dollars making pleasure into a god. And too many have opted to worship at that altar.

Examples abound. Just look at what -- and how much -- Americans eat and drink. Too many of us can’t seem to stop eating salty, fatty, and sugary foods. Our stomach says Stop, I’m full, but we say, Shut up, I want to keep experiencing pleasure. So we keep eating and overeating and putting on weight. Eventually, our desire for physical activity fades because it becomes too difficult. 

The same holds for drinking habits. Americans love super-sized sodas and juice drinks loaded with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and addictive sugar substitutes. So we make sure they’re everywhere: at fast food and chain restaurants, at sporting events, in vending machines at school, and in shopping establishments.
It’s no wonder we’ve developed an obesity epidemic. Today, over one third of American adults are considered to be obese -- more than double the number of 45 years ago. Our national genetics haven’t changed; our eating and drinking habits have.

We don’t fare much better in the area of personal spending and debt, either. Too many Americans have grown soft and self-indulgent when it comes to materialism and personal finances. We love to buy stuff. It’s pleasurable: jewelry, clothes, electronics, shoes, weekend getaways, tickets to sporting events, a big tab at a nice restaurant, a trip abroad.

Too many buy and buy, and run up debt. Many with good incomes can’t afford a down payment on a house or put money into a retirement account. Others borrow from friends or relatives, lacking a sense of peace about their current or future finances.

America’s personal bottom lines have become rather unseemly. Consumer debt (non-real estate) has more than tripled in the past 50 years. Today, a quarter of Americans have more money in credit card debt than they have in available savings to pay off that debt.

Unfortunately, our overindulgence in pleasure doesn’t stop at eating, drinking, and spending. Millions are battling substance abuse and/or alcoholism. Millions more struggle with smoking, gambling, hard and soft-core pornography, video games, prescription drugs, and other addictive products and behaviors.

Many people fail to connect the dots between our addiction to pleasure on the one hand, and the decline of American marriage and family on the other. But the connection is real. Commonsense tells us so. Before the No Pain, No Gain mantra seized the world of personal fitness, my folks used to counsel me with a similar adage: Little Effort, Little Results. The phrase was commonplace during my teen and young adulthood years, and it wasn't restricted to my school or work life. It applied to my personal life as well.

When it came to marriage and family, my parents thankfully didn’t preach much; instead they taught by example. I watched them do the difficult things necessary to make their marriage work. They spent a good chunk of time communicating, often spending time at night listening to each other’s concerns, ideas, or hopes. One or both might not have felt like listening, but it was important enough to the other -- so they routinely sacrificed TV time, reading time, hobby time, and relaxation to talk and listen.

When there were points of disagreement (there often were), each was willing to compromise to some degree for the other -- even though neither of them felt like compromising (about spending habits, weekend plans, projects around the house, family gatherings, etc.).

They made similar sacrifices for me and my siblings. Good parents know that raising children requires tremendous self-giving and sacrifice. There’s less sleep, flexibility, time, money, and energy to do just about everything a couple wants to do for themselves.

Indulgence in pleasure takes very little willpower. A lack of willpower to do what’s difficult, and focus on self, are hardly the habits one can afford to bring into long-term relationships, particularly marriage and family relations. Like eating a good diet, exercise, or saving money -- marriage and family involve persistent effort and sacrifice. Nowadays, large numbers of Americans seem ill-prepared to undergo this sacrifice and effort. We’ve slouched into a society of too many self-indulgent individualists, concerned primarily with our own hedonism and pleasure.
Many if not most of America’s ongoing ills can be tied to the decline of marriage and family: poverty, dependency, welfare, crime -- insolvency of Social Security and Medicare due to low birth rates. If Americans continue their attachment to doing the easy things for themselves, and don’t reclaim the mantle of effort and sacrifice for others in relationships, then marriage and family will continue to weaken, and that once great civilization, America, will continue to weaken along with them.

By J.G. Maggio



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