FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

Joseph F Barber | Create Your Badge
This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

STEALING FROM THE CITIZENRY

The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Saturday, April 23, 2016

What Motivates People To Take Action?

What Motivates People To Take Action?

individuality
First, what kind of motivation am I talking about?
I’m talking about the urge to pursue a goal to change things for the better. An urge that goes beyond the simple desire to belong to a group; that goes beyond the desire to reflect the pronouncements of authority; that goes beyond a need to bolster the status quo.
Eliminating those motivations, we are left with something that involves an individual taking a stand—and making his position public.
His position, his beliefs, his principles, his ideas.
The problem centers on his family, friends, colleagues, co-workers. To some degree, he feels enmeshed in a group, and that group would take a dim view of his ideas and actions. In the territory of his thoughts, he’s emerged from the shadows of conformity; but in the world? That’s a different story.
What would “they” think of him? What would they say? What would they do?
Is he willing to risk fracturing his relationships?
Is he willing to risk “being misunderstood?”
Most people stop at this point, reconsider, and fall back into line. They see The Group as the final arbiter of what they’re permitted to do.
But they’re missing something.
Some far more basic. Something that comes earlier.
As individuals, do they see that they have individual power?
Or not?
Do they understand they have the capacity to act independently in the world? And that these actions have strength?
Or not?
Because if they don’t see that, then where would they stand?
And next, do they realize they can form a vision of what they want to do—and do they sense this vision has power?
What I’m talking about here has nothing to do with making an assessment of the likelihood of success or victory versus the numbers of people who are asleep or who defend the status quo. That calculation is, at bottom, an excuse for doing nothing.
If sheer numbers were the deciding factor, all action would be rejected.
Boiling down the basis of motivation comes to this: does the individual realize he is an individual? Does he realize it in greater and greater degrees?
If not, he’ll root around in the forest and never form an independent vision.
A vast overemphasis on his “interdependence with others” will sentence him to grinding out his days.
The “individual who is first and foremost a part of the group” is a fiction. It becomes a convenient fiction for many. It rationalizes avoiding uncomfortable circumstances.
There is the old saw: with great power comes great responsibility. There is some truth in that, but in most cases people are urged to consider responsibility in a way that chokes off their power. The responsibility is directed toward group-duties.
The individual’s responsibility is toward himself. Then, assuming his own power, he can act. Then he can think about his connection to others—but even so, how much is there to think about, if he is forwarding a vision to make things better?
Critics will drag up examples of individuals who enacted destructive visions. But what do these criticisms add up to? The discovery that there are bad apples in the bunch? This is no revelation. Is the crazy dictator a justification for damning all individual action? Of course not.
Where does individual power come from? It comes from the creative urge, the creative impulse. This is deeper than the notion of solving problems. It’s deeper than mechanical resolutions.
If the major part of the last 10,000 years of human history has been dedicated to submerging the individual, then turning the formula right side up is not going to be a Sunday picnic. Understood. But the reversal has to start somewhere. It certainly isn’t going to start from the program of a group. That would be a root contradiction.
The longer a person waits for a spark of inspiration to jolt him into action, the less likely it is that he’ll cross the threshold into a new life.
Placing a “we” before an “I” may at first appear to be a strategy for exiting an old life, but it soon fades in the glaze of conformity that groups insist on.
Powerful groups can exist—when they are composed of powerful independent individuals, but the group does not give birth to the individual.
It never has.

What Motivates People To Take Action?

individuality
First, what kind of motivation am I talking about?
I’m talking about the urge to pursue a goal to change things for the better. An urge that goes beyond the simple desire to belong to a group; that goes beyond the desire to reflect the pronouncements of authority; that goes beyond a need to bolster the status quo.
Eliminating those motivations, we are left with something that involves an individual taking a stand—and making his position public.
His position, his beliefs, his principles, his ideas.
The problem centers on his family, friends, colleagues, co-workers. To some degree, he feels enmeshed in a group, and that group would take a dim view of his ideas and actions. In the territory of his thoughts, he’s emerged from the shadows of conformity; but in the world? That’s a different story.
What would “they” think of him? What would they say? What would they do?
Is he willing to risk fracturing his relationships?
Is he willing to risk “being misunderstood?”
Most people stop at this point, reconsider, and fall back into line. They see The Group as the final arbiter of what they’re permitted to do.
But they’re missing something.
Some far more basic. Something that comes earlier.
As individuals, do they see that they have individual power?
Or not?
Do they understand they have the capacity to act independently in the world? And that these actions have strength?
Or not?
Because if they don’t see that, then where would they stand?
And next, do they realize they can form a vision of what they want to do—and do they sense this vision has power?
What I’m talking about here has nothing to do with making an assessment of the likelihood of success or victory versus the numbers of people who are asleep or who defend the status quo. That calculation is, at bottom, an excuse for doing nothing.
If sheer numbers were the deciding factor, all action would be rejected.
Boiling down the basis of motivation comes to this: does the individual realize he is an individual? Does he realize it in greater and greater degrees?
If not, he’ll root around in the forest and never form an independent vision.
A vast overemphasis on his “interdependence with others” will sentence him to grinding out his days.
The “individual who is first and foremost a part of the group” is a fiction. It becomes a convenient fiction for many. It rationalizes avoiding uncomfortable circumstances.
There is the old saw: with great power comes great responsibility. There is some truth in that, but in most cases people are urged to consider responsibility in a way that chokes off their power. The responsibility is directed toward group-duties.
The individual’s responsibility is toward himself. Then, assuming his own power, he can act. Then he can think about his connection to others—but even so, how much is there to think about, if he is forwarding a vision to make things better?
Critics will drag up examples of individuals who enacted destructive visions. But what do these criticisms add up to? The discovery that there are bad apples in the bunch? This is no revelation. Is the crazy dictator a justification for damning all individual action? Of course not.
Where does individual power come from? It comes from the creative urge, the creative impulse. This is deeper than the notion of solving problems. It’s deeper than mechanical resolutions.
If the major part of the last 10,000 years of human history has been dedicated to submerging the individual, then turning the formula right side up is not going to be a Sunday picnic. Understood. But the reversal has to start somewhere. It certainly isn’t going to start from the program of a group. That would be a root contradiction.
The longer a person waits for a spark of inspiration to jolt him into action, the less likely it is that he’ll cross the threshold into a new life.
Placing a “we” before an “I” may at first appear to be a strategy for exiting an old life, but it soon fades in the glaze of conformity that groups insist on.
Powerful groups can exist—when they are composed of powerful independent individuals, but the group does not give birth to the individual.
It never has.


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