FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

Joseph F Barber | Create Your Badge
This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

To be GOVERNED

Not For Profit - For Global Justice and The Fight to End Violence & Hunger world wide - Since 1999
"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

This is the callout,This is the call to the Patriots,To stand up for all the ones who’ve been thrown away,This is the call to the all citizens ,Stand up!
Stand up and protect those who can not protect themselves our veterans ,the homeless & the forgotten take back our world today


To protect our independence, We take no government funds
Become A Supporting member of humanity to help end hunger and violence in our country,You have a right to live. You have a right to be. You have these rights regardless of money, health, social status, or class. You have these rights, man, woman, or child. These rights can never be taken away from you, they can only be infringed. When someone violates your rights, remember, it is not your fault.,


DISCOVER THE WORLD

Facebook Badge

FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience

↑ Grab this Headline Animator

The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

Thursday, October 26, 2017

COULD PRIVATE MILITARY WIN OUR LONGEST WAR?

COULD PRIVATE MILITARY WIN OUR LONGEST WAR?


John Stossel talks to founder of Blackwater about Afghanistan effort

We’ve fought in Afghanistan for 16 years now. Are we making progress?

After 9/11, we invaded, overthrew the Taliban, killed Osama bin Laden and – stayed. Afghanistan is now America’s longest war, ever.


President Trump’s solution? He’ll send several thousand more soldiers.

Erik Prince says he has a better idea – fight terrorists with only 2,000 American Special Operations personnel, plus “a contractor force” of 6,000.

Prince is the founder of Blackwater, the private military contractor.

The military uses contractors to provide security, deliver mail, rescue soldiers and more. Private contractors often do jobs well, for much less than the government would spend.

“We did a helicopter resupply mission,” Prince told me. “We showed up with two helicopters and eight people – the Navy was doing it with 35 people.”

I asked, “Why would the Navy use 35 people?”

Prince answered, “The admiral that says, ‘I need 35 people to do that mission,’ didn’t pay for them. When you get a free good, you use a lot more of it.”

Prince also claims the military is slow to adjust. In Afghanistan, it’s “using equipment designed to fight the Soviet Union, (not ideal) for finding enemies living in caves or operating from a pickup truck.”

I suggested that the government eventually adjusts.

“No, they do not,” answered Prince. “In 16 years of warfare, the army never adjusted how they do deployments – never made them smaller and more nimble. You could actually do all the counter-insurgency missions over Afghanistan with propeller-driven aircraft.”

So far, Trump has ignored Prince’s advice. I assume he, like many people, is skeptical of military contractors. The word “mercenary” has a bad reputation.

But private contractors have fought for America since America began. Jamestown, Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies all hired private security. During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress authorized “privateers” – privately owned boats – to fight British ships.

Before America officially entered World War II, some American pilots made money privately fighting the Japanese. Those “Flying Tigers” were called heroes. John Wayne made a movie about them.

“Markets have a way of providing things when government can’t,” says Prince.

But contracting is no panacea. The Congressional Budget Office says that although they save the government money during times of peace, during war “costs of a private security contract are comparable with those of a U.S. military unit.”


Economist Tyler Cowen points out that private contractors may make the real pain of war less apparent. In Iraq, says Cowen, “use of contractors may have helped to make an ill-advised venture possible.”

And in Iraq, Prince’s employees killed civilians. Four Blackwater employees were eventually convicted of voluntary manslaughter.

Prince replied, “The guys did more than a hundred thousand missions, protective missions, in dangerous war zones. In less than one half of 1 percent of all those missions did the guys ever discharge a firearm.”

Government has its own record of mistakes, civilian deaths and war crimes, too.

In 2010, Prince sold his security firm and moved on to other projects.

He persuaded the United Arab Emirates to fund a private anti-pirate force in Somalia. The U.N. called that a “brazen violation” of its arms embargo, but Prince went ahead anyway.

His mercenaries attacked pirates whenever they came near shore. His private army, plus merchant ships finally arming themselves, largely ended piracy in that part of the world. In 2010, Somali pirates took more than a thousand hostages. In 2014, they captured none.

Did you even hear about that success? I hadn’t before doing research on Prince. The media don’t like to report good things about for-profit soldiers. Commentator Keith Olbermann called Blackwater “a full-fledged criminal enterprise.” One TV anchor called Prince “horrible … the poster child for everything wrong with the military-industrial complex.”

When I showed that to Prince, he replied, “The hardcore antiwar left went after the troops in Vietnam. … (I)n Iraq and Afghanistan they went after contractors … contractors providing a good service to support the U.S. military – vilified, demonized, because they were for-profit companies.”

If we don’t use private contractors, he added, we will fail in Afghanistan, where we’ve “spent close to a trillion dollars and are still losing.”










COULD PRIVATE MILITARY WIN OUR LONGEST WAR?


John Stossel talks to founder of Blackwater about Afghanistan effort

We’ve fought in Afghanistan for 16 years now. Are we making progress?

After 9/11, we invaded, overthrew the Taliban, killed Osama bin Laden and – stayed. Afghanistan is now America’s longest war, ever.


President Trump’s solution? He’ll send several thousand more soldiers.

Erik Prince says he has a better idea – fight terrorists with only 2,000 American Special Operations personnel, plus “a contractor force” of 6,000.

Prince is the founder of Blackwater, the private military contractor.

The military uses contractors to provide security, deliver mail, rescue soldiers and more. Private contractors often do jobs well, for much less than the government would spend.

“We did a helicopter resupply mission,” Prince told me. “We showed up with two helicopters and eight people – the Navy was doing it with 35 people.”

I asked, “Why would the Navy use 35 people?”

Prince answered, “The admiral that says, ‘I need 35 people to do that mission,’ didn’t pay for them. When you get a free good, you use a lot more of it.”

Prince also claims the military is slow to adjust. In Afghanistan, it’s “using equipment designed to fight the Soviet Union, (not ideal) for finding enemies living in caves or operating from a pickup truck.”

I suggested that the government eventually adjusts.

“No, they do not,” answered Prince. “In 16 years of warfare, the army never adjusted how they do deployments – never made them smaller and more nimble. You could actually do all the counter-insurgency missions over Afghanistan with propeller-driven aircraft.”

So far, Trump has ignored Prince’s advice. I assume he, like many people, is skeptical of military contractors. The word “mercenary” has a bad reputation.

But private contractors have fought for America since America began. Jamestown, Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay colonies all hired private security. During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress authorized “privateers” – privately owned boats – to fight British ships.

Before America officially entered World War II, some American pilots made money privately fighting the Japanese. Those “Flying Tigers” were called heroes. John Wayne made a movie about them.

“Markets have a way of providing things when government can’t,” says Prince.

But contracting is no panacea. The Congressional Budget Office says that although they save the government money during times of peace, during war “costs of a private security contract are comparable with those of a U.S. military unit.”


Economist Tyler Cowen points out that private contractors may make the real pain of war less apparent. In Iraq, says Cowen, “use of contractors may have helped to make an ill-advised venture possible.”

And in Iraq, Prince’s employees killed civilians. Four Blackwater employees were eventually convicted of voluntary manslaughter.

Prince replied, “The guys did more than a hundred thousand missions, protective missions, in dangerous war zones. In less than one half of 1 percent of all those missions did the guys ever discharge a firearm.”

Government has its own record of mistakes, civilian deaths and war crimes, too.

In 2010, Prince sold his security firm and moved on to other projects.

He persuaded the United Arab Emirates to fund a private anti-pirate force in Somalia. The U.N. called that a “brazen violation” of its arms embargo, but Prince went ahead anyway.

His mercenaries attacked pirates whenever they came near shore. His private army, plus merchant ships finally arming themselves, largely ended piracy in that part of the world. In 2010, Somali pirates took more than a thousand hostages. In 2014, they captured none.

Did you even hear about that success? I hadn’t before doing research on Prince. The media don’t like to report good things about for-profit soldiers. Commentator Keith Olbermann called Blackwater “a full-fledged criminal enterprise.” One TV anchor called Prince “horrible … the poster child for everything wrong with the military-industrial complex.”

When I showed that to Prince, he replied, “The hardcore antiwar left went after the troops in Vietnam. … (I)n Iraq and Afghanistan they went after contractors … contractors providing a good service to support the U.S. military – vilified, demonized, because they were for-profit companies.”

If we don’t use private contractors, he added, we will fail in Afghanistan, where we’ve “spent close to a trillion dollars and are still losing.”