FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

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This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

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The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

America Can’t Call Itself Truly Patriotic When Thousands Of Veterans Remain Homeless

America Can’t Call Itself Truly Patriotic When Thousands Of Veterans Remain Homeless


I used to work nights at an Irish pub in Washington DC.  Naturally, a lot of people from Boston came in when they visited the capital. One night, a man of about 60 dropped in shortly after I stepped behind the bar.

He was a burly man with a very thick Boston accent, and I asked him how he was dealing with the DC humidity (it was June). “Doesn’t bother me,” he said, “I was in Vietnam, I can handle a little humidity.”

As he sat there, taking long and slow sips of his beer, we got to talking about what led him to DC. He revealed that this was the first time he’d been to the capital in his entire life, and that he had finally made the trek in order to visit the Vietnam Memorial.

He went on to tell me that he’d been waiting for his veteran's benefits for over a decade and this was the first time in 20 years that he’d left Boston. As a young man with numerous privileges, I couldn’t help but feel guilty about the ease of my existence, while this man’s youth was swallowed by war and destruction.

It is absolutely disgusting how this country treats its veterans. I couldn’t believe that this man was drafted into a war decades ago, and essentially had to wait until he was a senior citizen to receive repayment. For a country that prides itself on its patriotism, we do a terrible job taking care of the individuals that have fought in our wars.

I’m never a fan of war, and I don’t agree with the motivations behind many of the wars America has engaged in over the past half-century or so. But I will support those who have served. After all, many of those in Vietnam were not there by choice.

Moreover, all of the brave men and women who have fought in the War on Terror are volunteers. Regardless of the misguided policies that placed them in Iraq or Afghanistan, they came forward to put their lives on the line for their country. Simply put, all veterans deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, regardless of where or when they served.

It’s particularly hard not to think about these things as the United States threatens war against Russia, and considers how it will combat ISIS in Syria and Iraq. Regardless, this is an ongoing issue, and it must be addressed.

On any given night, there are nearly 60,000 homeless veterans on the streets of America.  That number is essentially equal to the number of Americans who died in the Vietnam War.

In total, around 12 percent of the adult homeless population are veterans. More generous statistics claim veterans make up closer to 9 percent of the total homeless population. Regardless, the fact is that thousands of veterans remain homeless, and this is simply a disgrace and a poor reflection of American society.

Furthermore, nearly half of all homeless veterans are African-American or Hispanic, despite the fact that the majority of the US population is Caucasian.

According to the National Coalition For Homeless Veterans:

The majority are single; live in urban areas; and suffer from mental illness, alcohol and/or substance abuse, or co-occurring disorders.

…Homeless veterans are younger on average than the total veteran population. Approximately 9% are between the ages of 18 and 30, and 41% are between the ages of 31 and 50.

…America's homeless veterans have served in World War II, the Korean War, Cold War, Vietnam War, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, Persian Gulf War, Afghanistan and Iraq (OEF/OIF), and the military's anti-drug cultivation efforts in South America.

Nearly half of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam era. Two-thirds served our country for at least three years, and one-third were stationed in a war zone.

Thus, many homeless veterans are Millennials. There are young and old veterans — a testament to amount of time the United States has spent waging war over the past half century or so. Moreover, most if not all of these veterans are there as a direct product of the wars they have fought in.

Many veterans are physically disabled, and have difficulty securing work. Additionally, a wide number of veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which makes it very difficult for those who have been exposed to the horrors of conflict to reintegrate into society.

Likewise, many of the skills that veterans learn in the military are not always very transferable in terms of the civilian workforce.

The Department for Veterans Affairs (VA) has committed to ending veteran homelessness by 2015, but the likelihood of this occurring is very slim.

On a positive note, in August, the VA approved $300 million in grants for homeless veterans and their families. Moreover, it was also recently announced that veteran homelessness has decreased by 33 percent since 2010. Yet, the struggle is far from over.

The United States shouldn’t go to war if it can’t afford it, period. And if we are going to send young people off to war, we damn well better take care of them when they come home. War is abhorrent, and painful to remember, but that does not mean we can forget those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

A lot of us walk past homeless people without even thinking about how they may have gotten there. As a society, we have been taught to look down upon the poor. In a nation that promotes entrepreneurship and ambition, the view seems to be that if someone is poor then it’s that person’s fault.

Next time you see a homeless person, try instead to imagine him or her in a crisp and clean soldier’s uniform.

Envision them crawling through the mud in the Vietnamese jungle, or ducking for cover in the Iraqi desert, or freezing while out on patrol during the harsh nights in Afghanistan. Imagine the blood, sweat and tears that they have given for this country.

Simply put, don’t judge the homeless, you never know what circumstances may have led them to that point. If you have never been in a position in which you’ve had to beg for money, then you really have no idea what it means to be homeless.

Likewise, the first step towards ending homelessness is changing the way that people perceive the poorest members of our society.

It does not reflect very well on a nation when its weakest members are alienated and stigmatized, particularly when many of them have fought in our wars. The United States can and should be better than that, and its veterans certainly deserve more.

I LEARNED ALOT BY MY OWN ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE ANND WHAT MANY VETERANS DEAL WITH DAY IN DAY OUT AFTER RETURNING HOME I AM NOT LIKE MANY OF THOSE THAT HAVE LOST THEIR WAY AND YET WE ARE THE SAME I HAVE MOMENTS THAT I CAN'T SLEEP SOMETIMES FOR DAYS AND FEAR TAKES OVER ME AND THAT IS EXTREMELY DIFFICULT FOR ME TO DEAL WITH AND SOME JUST GIVE UP ALL TOGETHER AND TAKE THEIR LIVES 


I AM JOSEPH F BARBER FOUNDER OF THE VETERANS PROJECT we are a small group of veterans women and men with families that run this program and we are making a difference in the lives of veterans across our nation,I ask you to visit our page all though it is not some well-built pro page it is a page of dedication and commitment to those left behind in the field even after they have returned home are page is a part of the blog FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience @ https://josephfreedomoranarchy.blogspot.com/ 

It upsets me to no end when I read statistics stating there are roughly 131,000 homeless veterans in America.  Why are there homeless veterans?! If the motto “leave no man behind” holds true, why has the US government and its citizens abandoned the very people who served their country and we the people the most?

Thank you for your service is just not enough as some 50,000 women veterans and many with children let alone the 60,000 men sleep on the streets you sleep in your warm homes and all you can say is thank you as our world and country changes a time is coming when we the people will need seasoned citizens to help protect we the people our community's and homes many of you Americans who lack the vision and fortitude, and fail to understand that you're either with us or against us. That includes fellow US troops who lack the skill, or who dare to question the wars.

If you are a true patriot and truly care for our vets the we ask you today to show your support 

Please provide whatever you can- $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100- To Use your debit/credit card or check click here:From Your Hand to the Homeless
Click here to lend your support to:  From Your Hand to the Homeless   and make a donation at pledgie.com !

We need your tax-deductible donation like never before. Please make it today.

PayPal
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5GUPMXQSBD9ZE

Thank you for your compassionate heart and desire to help men, women and children experiencing homelessness

We also are building homeless survival backs we give out to the homeless veterans and citizens alike

America Can’t Call Itself Truly Patriotic When Thousands Of Veterans Remain Homeless


I used to work nights at an Irish pub in Washington DC.  Naturally, a lot of people from Boston came in when they visited the capital. One night, a man of about 60 dropped in shortly after I stepped behind the bar.

He was a burly man with a very thick Boston accent, and I asked him how he was dealing with the DC humidity (it was June). “Doesn’t bother me,” he said, “I was in Vietnam, I can handle a little humidity.”

As he sat there, taking long and slow sips of his beer, we got to talking about what led him to DC. He revealed that this was the first time he’d been to the capital in his entire life, and that he had finally made the trek in order to visit the Vietnam Memorial.

He went on to tell me that he’d been waiting for his veteran's benefits for over a decade and this was the first time in 20 years that he’d left Boston. As a young man with numerous privileges, I couldn’t help but feel guilty about the ease of my existence, while this man’s youth was swallowed by war and destruction.

It is absolutely disgusting how this country treats its veterans. I couldn’t believe that this man was drafted into a war decades ago, and essentially had to wait until he was a senior citizen to receive repayment. For a country that prides itself on its patriotism, we do a terrible job taking care of the individuals that have fought in our wars.

I’m never a fan of war, and I don’t agree with the motivations behind many of the wars America has engaged in over the past half-century or so. But I will support those who have served. After all, many of those in Vietnam were not there by choice.

Moreover, all of the brave men and women who have fought in the War on Terror are volunteers. Regardless of the misguided policies that placed them in Iraq or Afghanistan, they came forward to put their lives on the line for their country. Simply put, all veterans deserve to be treated with dignity and respect, regardless of where or when they served.

It’s particularly hard not to think about these things as the United States threatens war against Russia, and considers how it will combat ISIS in Syria and Iraq. Regardless, this is an ongoing issue, and it must be addressed.

On any given night, there are nearly 60,000 homeless veterans on the streets of America.  That number is essentially equal to the number of Americans who died in the Vietnam War.

In total, around 12 percent of the adult homeless population are veterans. More generous statistics claim veterans make up closer to 9 percent of the total homeless population. Regardless, the fact is that thousands of veterans remain homeless, and this is simply a disgrace and a poor reflection of American society.

Furthermore, nearly half of all homeless veterans are African-American or Hispanic, despite the fact that the majority of the US population is Caucasian.

According to the National Coalition For Homeless Veterans:

The majority are single; live in urban areas; and suffer from mental illness, alcohol and/or substance abuse, or co-occurring disorders.

…Homeless veterans are younger on average than the total veteran population. Approximately 9% are between the ages of 18 and 30, and 41% are between the ages of 31 and 50.

…America's homeless veterans have served in World War II, the Korean War, Cold War, Vietnam War, Grenada, Panama, Lebanon, Persian Gulf War, Afghanistan and Iraq (OEF/OIF), and the military's anti-drug cultivation efforts in South America.

Nearly half of homeless veterans served during the Vietnam era. Two-thirds served our country for at least three years, and one-third were stationed in a war zone.

Thus, many homeless veterans are Millennials. There are young and old veterans — a testament to amount of time the United States has spent waging war over the past half century or so. Moreover, most if not all of these veterans are there as a direct product of the wars they have fought in.

Many veterans are physically disabled, and have difficulty securing work. Additionally, a wide number of veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which makes it very difficult for those who have been exposed to the horrors of conflict to reintegrate into society.

Likewise, many of the skills that veterans learn in the military are not always very transferable in terms of the civilian workforce.

The Department for Veterans Affairs (VA) has committed to ending veteran homelessness by 2015, but the likelihood of this occurring is very slim.

On a positive note, in August, the VA approved $300 million in grants for homeless veterans and their families. Moreover, it was also recently announced that veteran homelessness has decreased by 33 percent since 2010. Yet, the struggle is far from over.

The United States shouldn’t go to war if it can’t afford it, period. And if we are going to send young people off to war, we damn well better take care of them when they come home. War is abhorrent, and painful to remember, but that does not mean we can forget those who have made the ultimate sacrifice.

A lot of us walk past homeless people without even thinking about how they may have gotten there. As a society, we have been taught to look down upon the poor. In a nation that promotes entrepreneurship and ambition, the view seems to be that if someone is poor then it’s that person’s fault.

Next time you see a homeless person, try instead to imagine him or her in a crisp and clean soldier’s uniform.

Envision them crawling through the mud in the Vietnamese jungle, or ducking for cover in the Iraqi desert, or freezing while out on patrol during the harsh nights in Afghanistan. Imagine the blood, sweat and tears that they have given for this country.

Simply put, don’t judge the homeless, you never know what circumstances may have led them to that point. If you have never been in a position in which you’ve had to beg for money, then you really have no idea what it means to be homeless.

Likewise, the first step towards ending homelessness is changing the way that people perceive the poorest members of our society.

It does not reflect very well on a nation when its weakest members are alienated and stigmatized, particularly when many of them have fought in our wars. The United States can and should be better than that, and its veterans certainly deserve more.

I LEARNED ALOT BY MY OWN ACTIVE DUTY SERVICE ANND WHAT MANY VETERANS DEAL WITH DAY IN DAY OUT AFTER RETURNING HOME I AM NOT LIKE MANY OF THOSE THAT HAVE LOST THEIR WAY AND YET WE ARE THE SAME I HAVE MOMENTS THAT I CAN'T SLEEP SOMETIMES FOR DAYS AND FEAR TAKES OVER ME AND THAT IS EXTREMELY DIFFICULT FOR ME TO DEAL WITH AND SOME JUST GIVE UP ALL TOGETHER AND TAKE THEIR LIVES 


I AM JOSEPH F BARBER FOUNDER OF THE VETERANS PROJECT we are a small group of veterans women and men with families that run this program and we are making a difference in the lives of veterans across our nation,I ask you to visit our page all though it is not some well-built pro page it is a page of dedication and commitment to those left behind in the field even after they have returned home are page is a part of the blog FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience @ https://josephfreedomoranarchy.blogspot.com/ 

It upsets me to no end when I read statistics stating there are roughly 131,000 homeless veterans in America.  Why are there homeless veterans?! If the motto “leave no man behind” holds true, why has the US government and its citizens abandoned the very people who served their country and we the people the most?

Thank you for your service is just not enough as some 50,000 women veterans and many with children let alone the 60,000 men sleep on the streets you sleep in your warm homes and all you can say is thank you as our world and country changes a time is coming when we the people will need seasoned citizens to help protect we the people our community's and homes many of you Americans who lack the vision and fortitude, and fail to understand that you're either with us or against us. That includes fellow US troops who lack the skill, or who dare to question the wars.

If you are a true patriot and truly care for our vets the we ask you today to show your support 

Please provide whatever you can- $1, $5, $10, $20, $50, $100- To Use your debit/credit card or check click here:From Your Hand to the Homeless
Click here to lend your support to:  From Your Hand to the Homeless   and make a donation at pledgie.com !

We need your tax-deductible donation like never before. Please make it today.

PayPal
https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=5GUPMXQSBD9ZE

Thank you for your compassionate heart and desire to help men, women and children experiencing homelessness

We also are building homeless survival backs we give out to the homeless veterans and citizens alike



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