FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

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The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Saturday, July 2, 2016

Little Known American Founder: Elizabeth Powel

It was Elizabeth Powel who gave us an example to follow when it comes to what it takes to keep the republic

Little Known American Founder: Elizabeth Powel


By name, most folks may not recognize Elizabeth Powel from American History. Her identity is revealed when we realize Elizabeth Powel was the woman in a bonnet met by Benjamin Franklin on a grassy hill after the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention. She asked, “Sir, what have you given us?  A monarchy, or a republic?”

Franklin responded, “A republic, ma’am, if you can keep it.”

In our quest as Americans to save our republic, we have become content in participating only in the part of our system that more resembles democracy. We vote, then kick up our feet at home, and complain. That is what people do in a pure democracy. We do not have a democracy. We have a republic.

Elizabeth who convinced Washington that “Mr. President” was a good enough title
To keep the republic requires much more effort than merely voting. Don’t get me wrong – voting is very important. But, we must also learn to influence our representatives, and be informed about the issues of the day. In short, we need to take lessons from Elizabeth Powel, who, though she could not vote, was an incredible keeper of the republic.

The wife of Samuel Powel, mayor of Philadelphia, together with her husband she operated what today we would call a ‘bed and breakfast.’  To attract the most important travelers, at their inn they offered opulent dinners.  It is said that during the convention, George Washington spent most of his suppers at the Powel House.

When the meal concluded, the men would retreat to the parlor to light up their pipes and discuss politics.  Uncharacteristic of the women of her day, Elizabeth followed the men into the parlor, and debated with them about the issues of the day.  Those who witnessed Powel’s astute conversations wrote she was “witty,” “intelligent,” and “unwavering.”

She developed friendships with the founders, and in particular, George Washington.  It was common to see Elizabeth and George strolling the streets of Philadelphia discussing various issues.  It was Elizabeth who convinced Washington that “Mr. President” was a good enough title, rather than some of the other titles of preference being offered. . . like “Your majesty,” “your excellence,” or “your highly mightiness.”

When Washington’s first term as President of the United States was reaching its end, Washington told three people he was considering not serving another term.  Those people were Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Elizabeth Powel.  It was Elizabeth who convinced George to serve a second term, arguing that he was the foundation of the new system, and if he abandoned it the people would lose faith in the new Constitution.

Which brings us back to that conversation between Elizabeth Powel and Benjamin Franklin.  “If you can keep it,” instructed Dr. Franklin.  How could she keep the republic if she couldn’t even vote?

Voting is the sole tool of democracy, but we are a republic, and it was Elizabeth Powel who gave us an example to follow when it comes to what it takes to keep the republic. If we follow her lead, doing more than just voting, we, too, will be able to “keep the republic.”

Douglas V. Gibbs It was Elizabeth Powel who gave us an example to follow when it comes to what it takes to keep the republic

Little Known American Founder: Elizabeth Powel


By name, most folks may not recognize Elizabeth Powel from American History. Her identity is revealed when we realize Elizabeth Powel was the woman in a bonnet met by Benjamin Franklin on a grassy hill after the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention. She asked, “Sir, what have you given us?  A monarchy, or a republic?”

Franklin responded, “A republic, ma’am, if you can keep it.”

In our quest as Americans to save our republic, we have become content in participating only in the part of our system that more resembles democracy. We vote, then kick up our feet at home, and complain. That is what people do in a pure democracy. We do not have a democracy. We have a republic.

Elizabeth who convinced Washington that “Mr. President” was a good enough title
To keep the republic requires much more effort than merely voting. Don’t get me wrong – voting is very important. But, we must also learn to influence our representatives, and be informed about the issues of the day. In short, we need to take lessons from Elizabeth Powel, who, though she could not vote, was an incredible keeper of the republic.

The wife of Samuel Powel, mayor of Philadelphia, together with her husband she operated what today we would call a ‘bed and breakfast.’  To attract the most important travelers, at their inn they offered opulent dinners.  It is said that during the convention, George Washington spent most of his suppers at the Powel House.

When the meal concluded, the men would retreat to the parlor to light up their pipes and discuss politics.  Uncharacteristic of the women of her day, Elizabeth followed the men into the parlor, and debated with them about the issues of the day.  Those who witnessed Powel’s astute conversations wrote she was “witty,” “intelligent,” and “unwavering.”

She developed friendships with the founders, and in particular, George Washington.  It was common to see Elizabeth and George strolling the streets of Philadelphia discussing various issues.  It was Elizabeth who convinced Washington that “Mr. President” was a good enough title, rather than some of the other titles of preference being offered. . . like “Your majesty,” “your excellence,” or “your highly mightiness.”

When Washington’s first term as President of the United States was reaching its end, Washington told three people he was considering not serving another term.  Those people were Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and Elizabeth Powel.  It was Elizabeth who convinced George to serve a second term, arguing that he was the foundation of the new system, and if he abandoned it the people would lose faith in the new Constitution.

Which brings us back to that conversation between Elizabeth Powel and Benjamin Franklin.  “If you can keep it,” instructed Dr. Franklin.  How could she keep the republic if she couldn’t even vote?

Voting is the sole tool of democracy, but we are a republic, and it was Elizabeth Powel who gave us an example to follow when it comes to what it takes to keep the republic. If we follow her lead, doing more than just voting, we, too, will be able to “keep the republic.”

Douglas V. Gibbs

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