FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

Joseph F Barber | Create Your Badge
This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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TOOL REPLACEMENT FUND

Help launch this campaign and become the first donor. WE HAVE HAD ALL OUR TOOLS STOLEN FROM US AND THEY ARE UNRECOVERABLE AND IT IS VITAL TO OUR EFFORTS THATY THESES TOOLS BE REPLACED ,THEY ARE THE MAIN SOURCE OF OUR REVENUE THAT SUPPORTS OUR EFFORTS TO HELP FEED HOUSE VETERANS & CITIZENS ALIKE

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Not For Profit - For Global Justice and The Fight to End Violence & Hunger world wide - Since 1999
"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

This is the callout,This is the call to the Patriots,To stand up for all the ones who’ve been thrown away,This is the call to the all citizens ,Stand up!
Stand up and protect those who can not protect themselves our veterans ,the homeless & the forgotten take back our world today


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Become A Supporting member of humanity to help end hunger and violence in our country,You have a right to live. You have a right to be. You have these rights regardless of money, health, social status, or class. You have these rights, man, woman, or child. These rights can never be taken away from you, they can only be infringed. When someone violates your rights, remember, it is not your fault.,


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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

STEALING FROM THE CITIZENRY

The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Waco Horror Commemoration

Waco Horror Commemoration


One hundred years ago this week, Jesse Washington, an eighteen-year-old African American man, was burned at the stake in Waco, Texas.
On May 8, 1916 a 53-year-old white woman named Lucy Fryar was bludgeoned to death outside her home, seven miles south of the city. The chief and only suspect was Washington, an illiterate farm hand who worked for Lucy and her husband George.
Reported to have anger issues and mental disabilities, Washington allegedly left his cotton plow to get more seed from Mrs. Fryar. As she was measuring cotton seed out, she reportedly scolded him for his harsh treatment of the plow mules and Washington took offense, striking her in the head with a blacksmith’s hammer. He then allegedly raped and killed her.
Afterwards, he apparently resumed his work in the Fryar cotton field and then returned home to the cabin he shared with his parents. When the body of Mrs. Fryar was discovered, authorities immediately suspected Washington and found him whittling a stick in his parents’ back yard.
McLennan County authorities arrested Washington and transported him to the county jail, but transferred him shortly thereafter. Considering the nature of the crime and the ethnicity of the chief suspect, they knew a lynching party would appear, so they conveyed Washington to Dallas.
On May 9, McLennan County Sheriff Sam S. Fleming and County Attorney John B. McNamara announced that Washington (who was still in Dallas County) had confessed (possibly under duress) and signed his “X” to a written confession. Sheriff Fleming and McNamara also reported that Washington had indicated where the murder weapon was located and officials reportedly discovered it in that very spot.
A McLennan County grand jury was subsequently convened and Washington was indicted for murder (not rape) in absentia. He was returned in the middle of the night on May 15, and stealthily delivered the following morning to the courthouse. The courtroom his case was tried in had the capacity for 500 people and was reportedly stuffed with 1,500. The trial, presided over by District Judge R. L. Munroe, began at 10:00 am and was over before 11:00 am.
Washington pled guilty and before Judge Munroe had even finished recording the verdict, a large man in rear of the court room shouted “Get the Nigger.” In seconds the mob was upon Washington and Sheriff Fleming (who had ordered his men not to obstruct the anticipated vigilantism) and the court stenographer snuck out a side door while Judge Munroe watched helplessly (if not passively).
The mob secured Washington with a chain, dragged him out of the courthouse and then escorted him over to a yard next to Waco City Hall. While en route, he was “half-led, half-dragged and pushed all the time,” members of the attending mob ripping off his clothes, slicing off one of his ears and several of his fingers, stabbing him repeatedly (up to twenty-five times according to some accounts) and castrating him.
The mob had placed a large amount of kindling under a tree in the yard, and when the grotesque procession reached it, the chain securing Washington (who was now covered in his own blood) was tossed over a sturdy limb. A fire was lit and Washington was suspended by the chain over it. As the flames rose, the crowd (which now included women and children) roared with delight and Washington impossibly but reflexively attempted to climb the chain with his fingerless hands. Washington was lowered and raised into and out of the flames for maximum effect. Waco Mayor John Dollins watched from his 2nd floor city hall window and the Waco Chief of Police stood amongst the 10,000-15,000 onlookers.
After the conflagration died down, Washington’s charred torso (with flame-severed limbs) was raised high in the tree and the chain tied off so Waco citizens could get their picture taken with it. Then, pranksters on horseback cut Washington’s remains down, placed the blackened cadaver in a tow sack and dragged it through the city streets. The torso was later attached to a car and drug to the Robinson community, where it was hung from a telephone pole.
A Waco photographer named Fred Gildersleeve chronicled the event and his pictures appeared in newspapers around the country. He would later immortalize some of the images in lynching postcards, but the citizens of Waco eventually grew squeamish and asked Gildersleeve to refrain from exploiting the incident. The photos were casting the entire community in a disturbing light.
In recent years, a persistent Waco contingent has proposed a historical marker acknowledging what came to be known as the Waco Horror, but the effort has been met with considerable opposition.
This Sunday, May 15, will mark the 100th anniversary of this atrocity. It will be memorialized by the McLennan County Community Race Relations Coalition at the Bledsoe Miller Recreation Center at 300 N. MLK Blvd at 2:00 pm.

Waco Horror Commemoration


One hundred years ago this week, Jesse Washington, an eighteen-year-old African American man, was burned at the stake in Waco, Texas.
On May 8, 1916 a 53-year-old white woman named Lucy Fryar was bludgeoned to death outside her home, seven miles south of the city. The chief and only suspect was Washington, an illiterate farm hand who worked for Lucy and her husband George.
Reported to have anger issues and mental disabilities, Washington allegedly left his cotton plow to get more seed from Mrs. Fryar. As she was measuring cotton seed out, she reportedly scolded him for his harsh treatment of the plow mules and Washington took offense, striking her in the head with a blacksmith’s hammer. He then allegedly raped and killed her.
Afterwards, he apparently resumed his work in the Fryar cotton field and then returned home to the cabin he shared with his parents. When the body of Mrs. Fryar was discovered, authorities immediately suspected Washington and found him whittling a stick in his parents’ back yard.
McLennan County authorities arrested Washington and transported him to the county jail, but transferred him shortly thereafter. Considering the nature of the crime and the ethnicity of the chief suspect, they knew a lynching party would appear, so they conveyed Washington to Dallas.
On May 9, McLennan County Sheriff Sam S. Fleming and County Attorney John B. McNamara announced that Washington (who was still in Dallas County) had confessed (possibly under duress) and signed his “X” to a written confession. Sheriff Fleming and McNamara also reported that Washington had indicated where the murder weapon was located and officials reportedly discovered it in that very spot.
A McLennan County grand jury was subsequently convened and Washington was indicted for murder (not rape) in absentia. He was returned in the middle of the night on May 15, and stealthily delivered the following morning to the courthouse. The courtroom his case was tried in had the capacity for 500 people and was reportedly stuffed with 1,500. The trial, presided over by District Judge R. L. Munroe, began at 10:00 am and was over before 11:00 am.
Washington pled guilty and before Judge Munroe had even finished recording the verdict, a large man in rear of the court room shouted “Get the Nigger.” In seconds the mob was upon Washington and Sheriff Fleming (who had ordered his men not to obstruct the anticipated vigilantism) and the court stenographer snuck out a side door while Judge Munroe watched helplessly (if not passively).
The mob secured Washington with a chain, dragged him out of the courthouse and then escorted him over to a yard next to Waco City Hall. While en route, he was “half-led, half-dragged and pushed all the time,” members of the attending mob ripping off his clothes, slicing off one of his ears and several of his fingers, stabbing him repeatedly (up to twenty-five times according to some accounts) and castrating him.
The mob had placed a large amount of kindling under a tree in the yard, and when the grotesque procession reached it, the chain securing Washington (who was now covered in his own blood) was tossed over a sturdy limb. A fire was lit and Washington was suspended by the chain over it. As the flames rose, the crowd (which now included women and children) roared with delight and Washington impossibly but reflexively attempted to climb the chain with his fingerless hands. Washington was lowered and raised into and out of the flames for maximum effect. Waco Mayor John Dollins watched from his 2nd floor city hall window and the Waco Chief of Police stood amongst the 10,000-15,000 onlookers.
After the conflagration died down, Washington’s charred torso (with flame-severed limbs) was raised high in the tree and the chain tied off so Waco citizens could get their picture taken with it. Then, pranksters on horseback cut Washington’s remains down, placed the blackened cadaver in a tow sack and dragged it through the city streets. The torso was later attached to a car and drug to the Robinson community, where it was hung from a telephone pole.
A Waco photographer named Fred Gildersleeve chronicled the event and his pictures appeared in newspapers around the country. He would later immortalize some of the images in lynching postcards, but the citizens of Waco eventually grew squeamish and asked Gildersleeve to refrain from exploiting the incident. The photos were casting the entire community in a disturbing light.
In recent years, a persistent Waco contingent has proposed a historical marker acknowledging what came to be known as the Waco Horror, but the effort has been met with considerable opposition.
This Sunday, May 15, will mark the 100th anniversary of this atrocity. It will be memorialized by the McLennan County Community Race Relations Coalition at the Bledsoe Miller Recreation Center at 300 N. MLK Blvd at 2:00 pm.


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