FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

Joseph F Barber | Create Your Badge
This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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Not For Profit - For Global Justice and The Fight to End Violence & Hunger world wide - Since 1999
"Liberty cannot be preserved without a general knowledge among the people" - John Adams - Second President - 1797 - 1801

This is the callout,This is the call to the Patriots,To stand up for all the ones who’ve been thrown away,This is the call to the all citizens ,Stand up!
Stand up and protect those who can not protect themselves our veterans ,the homeless & the forgotten take back our world today


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Become A Supporting member of humanity to help end hunger and violence in our country,You have a right to live. You have a right to be. You have these rights regardless of money, health, social status, or class. You have these rights, man, woman, or child. These rights can never be taken away from you, they can only be infringed. When someone violates your rights, remember, it is not your fault.,


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FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience

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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

STEALING FROM THE CITIZENRY

The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Saturday, June 25, 2016

The Most Powerful Case For The U.S. War Resistors

 The Most Powerful Case For The U.S. War Resistors  


We say No to War sign seen at a 2007 anti-war protest. (Photo by Thiago Santos on flickr)
We cannot have peace if we are only concerned with peace. War is not an accident. It is the logical outcome of a certain way of life. If we want to attack war, we have to attack that way of life.” “The problem after a war is with the victor. He thinks he has just proved that war and violence pay. Who will now teach him a lesson?” “No Big Power in all history ever thought of itself as an aggressor. That is still true today.” There is no way to peace; peace is the way.

Above Photo: We say No to War sign seen at a 2007 anti-war protest. (Photo by Thiago Santos on flickr)

Supporting the right to oppose an illegal war

front_cover_for_websiteOn February 15, 2003, 15 million people around the globe marched in opposition to the impending war in Iraq. Despite not convincing the U.S. or UK governments to draw back from their invasion plans, the pressure generated that day did convince several governments, including Canada’s, not to participate in what would turn out to be a military debacle that the United States and the United Kingdom are still reeling from more than a decade later.
While the anti-war movement would peter out over the next few years, the consequences of the war in Iraq would continue to influence Canadian politics as hundreds of American soldiers would venture north of the border in hopes of not participating in the conflict.
Quickly, anti-war activists began mobilizing support for these war resisters, launching a political and legal campaign aimed at allowing these soldiers to remain in Canada.
Let Them Stay: U.S. War Resisters in Canada, 2004-2016, a new book edited by Sarah Hipworth and Luke Stewart, tells the amazing and powerful story of these resisters and the campaign to defend their right to oppose an illegal war.
Divided into two parts, Let Them Stay begins by giving voice to the actual resisters. Their accounts detail their decision to no longer fight, their flight to Canada and the difficult challenges that being in Canada has been as the Canadian State keeps trying to deport them back to certain military court marshals and jail sentences.
The stories they tell reveal how the soldiers’ worldviews are turned upside down, with many witnessing the brutality of invasion and deciding that these actions did not jive with their moral compass. But the consequences of this realization are gut-wrenching, as the soldiers and their significant others make the difficult decision to leave behind their families and social networks, unlikely to see them again for a very long time.
Once in Canada, the resisters attempt to find normalcy, but quickly discover that the governments of the day (both the Liberals and Conservatives) do not welcome them as Canada did draft dodgers from the Vietnam War in the 1960s and 1970s.
These accounts are the most emotionally powerful arguments for their case, showcasing the torment behind their decision to leave the military, detailing how the psychological injuries the experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to plague them, and revealing the kind of harm that would be done to their families (with many having children born in Canada) if they are sent back to face certain jail time.
The second part of the book reproduces the most significant material of the War Resistors Support Campaign (WRSC) and outlines the legal strategies and issues that the campaign has employed in defending the resisters from deportation.
This ends up being an amazing archive tracing the campaign’s efforts, showing us the petitions, letters and other material that WRSC used to mobilize support and influence public opinion. So successful were their efforts that polls began to show a solid majority of Canadians supporting amnesty for the resisters.
Additionally, the three pieces outlining the legal strategy shed light onto the quickly changing international consensus on what kind of war resister is eligible for refugee status and the kinds of arguments that have been persuasive in Canadian courts.
Let Them Stay ends up being both a detailed and powerful account of the war resisters and their campaign as well as an important political tool as the current Liberal government considers whether to allow the former soldiers to stay.
As the WRSC aims to mobilize more voices to pressure MPs to support amnesty, this book will be an invaluable resource to bolster the case to let the resisters stay!

 The Most Powerful Case For The U.S. War Resistors  


We say No to War sign seen at a 2007 anti-war protest. (Photo by Thiago Santos on flickr)
We cannot have peace if we are only concerned with peace. War is not an accident. It is the logical outcome of a certain way of life. If we want to attack war, we have to attack that way of life.” “The problem after a war is with the victor. He thinks he has just proved that war and violence pay. Who will now teach him a lesson?” “No Big Power in all history ever thought of itself as an aggressor. That is still true today.” There is no way to peace; peace is the way.

Above Photo: We say No to War sign seen at a 2007 anti-war protest. (Photo by Thiago Santos on flickr)

Supporting the right to oppose an illegal war

front_cover_for_websiteOn February 15, 2003, 15 million people around the globe marched in opposition to the impending war in Iraq. Despite not convincing the U.S. or UK governments to draw back from their invasion plans, the pressure generated that day did convince several governments, including Canada’s, not to participate in what would turn out to be a military debacle that the United States and the United Kingdom are still reeling from more than a decade later.
While the anti-war movement would peter out over the next few years, the consequences of the war in Iraq would continue to influence Canadian politics as hundreds of American soldiers would venture north of the border in hopes of not participating in the conflict.
Quickly, anti-war activists began mobilizing support for these war resisters, launching a political and legal campaign aimed at allowing these soldiers to remain in Canada.
Let Them Stay: U.S. War Resisters in Canada, 2004-2016, a new book edited by Sarah Hipworth and Luke Stewart, tells the amazing and powerful story of these resisters and the campaign to defend their right to oppose an illegal war.
Divided into two parts, Let Them Stay begins by giving voice to the actual resisters. Their accounts detail their decision to no longer fight, their flight to Canada and the difficult challenges that being in Canada has been as the Canadian State keeps trying to deport them back to certain military court marshals and jail sentences.
The stories they tell reveal how the soldiers’ worldviews are turned upside down, with many witnessing the brutality of invasion and deciding that these actions did not jive with their moral compass. But the consequences of this realization are gut-wrenching, as the soldiers and their significant others make the difficult decision to leave behind their families and social networks, unlikely to see them again for a very long time.
Once in Canada, the resisters attempt to find normalcy, but quickly discover that the governments of the day (both the Liberals and Conservatives) do not welcome them as Canada did draft dodgers from the Vietnam War in the 1960s and 1970s.
These accounts are the most emotionally powerful arguments for their case, showcasing the torment behind their decision to leave the military, detailing how the psychological injuries the experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan continue to plague them, and revealing the kind of harm that would be done to their families (with many having children born in Canada) if they are sent back to face certain jail time.
The second part of the book reproduces the most significant material of the War Resistors Support Campaign (WRSC) and outlines the legal strategies and issues that the campaign has employed in defending the resisters from deportation.
This ends up being an amazing archive tracing the campaign’s efforts, showing us the petitions, letters and other material that WRSC used to mobilize support and influence public opinion. So successful were their efforts that polls began to show a solid majority of Canadians supporting amnesty for the resisters.
Additionally, the three pieces outlining the legal strategy shed light onto the quickly changing international consensus on what kind of war resister is eligible for refugee status and the kinds of arguments that have been persuasive in Canadian courts.
Let Them Stay ends up being both a detailed and powerful account of the war resisters and their campaign as well as an important political tool as the current Liberal government considers whether to allow the former soldiers to stay.
As the WRSC aims to mobilize more voices to pressure MPs to support amnesty, this book will be an invaluable resource to bolster the case to let the resisters stay!


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