FREEDOM OR ANARCHY,Campaign of Conscience.

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This blog does not promote, support, condone, encourage, advocate, nor in any way endorse any racist (or "racialist") ideologies, nor any armed and/or violent revolutionary, seditionist and/or terrorist activities. Any racial separatist or militant groups listed here are solely for reference and Opinions of multiple authors including Freedom or Anarchy Campaign of conscience.

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The Free Thought Project,The Daily Sheeple & FREEDOM OR ANARCHY Campaign of Conscience are dedicated to holding those who claim authority over our lives accountable. “Each of us has a unique part to play in the healing of the world.”
“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.” - George Orwell, 1984

"Until the philosophy which holds one race superior and another inferior is finally and permanently discredited and abandoned, everywhere is war and until there are no longer first-class and second-class citizens of any nation, until the color of a man's skin is of no more significance than the color of his eyes. And until the basic human rights are equally guaranteed to all without regard to race, there is war. And until that day, the dream of lasting peace, world citizenship, rule of international morality, will remain but a fleeting illusion to be pursued, but never attained... now everywhere is war." - - Haile Selassie I of Ethiopia - Popularized by Bob Marley in the song War

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The right to tell the Government to kiss my Ass Important Message for All Law Enforcers Freedom; what it is, and what it is not. Unadulterated freedom is an unattainable goal; that is what the founders of America knew and understood, which was their impetus behind the documents that established our great nation. They also knew that one of the primary driving forces in human nature is the unconscious desire to be truly free. This meant to them that mankind if totally left completely unrestricted would pursue all things in life without any awareness or acknowledgement of the consequences of his/her own actions leaving only the individual conscience if they had one as a control on behavior. This would not bode well in the development of a great society. Yet the founders of America chose to allow men/women as much liberty as could be, with minimum impact on the freedom or liberties of others

Thursday, June 2, 2016

In 2016 About 45.8 Million People Are Slaves In 167 Countries

In 2016 About 45.8 Million People Are Slaves In 167 Countries

Simon Buxton/Anti-Slavery International


This estimate draws on data from random sample, nationally representative surveys conducted by Gallup.

What is the estimated prevalence of modern slavery country by country, and what is the absolute number by population?

The 2016 Global Slavery Index estimates that 45.8 million people are subject to some form of modern slavery in the world today. The Index presents a ranking of 167 countries based on the proportion of the population that is estimated to be in modern slavery.
The countries with the highest estimated prevalence of modern slavery by the proportion of their population are North Korea, Uzbekistan, Cambodia, India, and Qatar. In North Korea, there is pervasive evidence that government-sanctioned forced labour occurs in an extensive system of prison labour camps while North Korean women are subjected to forced marriage and commercial sexual exploitation in China and other neighbouring states. In Uzbekistan, the government continues to subject its citizens to forced labour in the annual cotton harvest.
Those countries with the highest absolute numbers of people in modern slavery are India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Uzbekistan. Several of these countries provide the low-cost labour that produces consumer goods for markets in Western Europe, Japan, North America and Australia.
The countries with the lowest estimated prevalence of modern slavery by the proportion of their population are Luxembourg, Ireland, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria, Sweden and Belgium, the United States and Canada, and Australia and New Zealand. These countries generally have more economic wealth, score higher on government response, have low levels of conflict, and are politically stable with a willingness to combat modern slavery.

VULNERABILITY

What factors explain or predict the prevalence of modern slavery?

Vulnerability to modern slavery is affected by a complex interaction of factors related to the presence or absence of protection and respect for rights, physical safety and security, access to the necessities of life such as food, water and health care, and patterns of migration, displacement and conflict. Statistical testing grouped 24 measures of vulnerability into four dimensions covering: 1) civil and political protections, 2) social health and economic rights, 3) personal security, and 4) refugee populations and conflict.
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.07.14 PM
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.07.45 PM

GOVERNMENT RESPONSE

How are governments tackling modern slavery?

In 2016, 161 countries are included in our assessment of government responses. Due to the ongoing conflict and extreme disruption to government function, we have not included ratings for Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria or Yemen.
Of the 161 countries:
  • 124 have criminalised human trafficking in line with the UN Trafficking Protocol.
  • 96 have National Action Plans (NAPs) to coordinate the government’s response.
  • 150 governments provide some form of service for victims of modern slavery.
The governments that have the strongest response to modern slavery are The Netherlands, the United States of America, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Australia, Portugal, Croatia, Spain, Belgium and Norway. These countries are characterised by strong political will, sufficient resources, and a strong civil society that holds governments to account.

When correlated against GDP (PPP), countries which have a relatively strong response despite fewer resources are the Philippines, Brazil, Georgia, Jamaica, Croatia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Moldova, Albania and Serbia.
Those governments taking the least action to combat modern slavery are North Korea, Iran, Eritrea, Equatorial Guinea, Hong Kong, Central African Republic, Papua New Guinea, Guinea, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. Some of these countries are characterised by government complicity, low levels of political will, or high levels of conflict and political instability.
Some wealthier and more stable countries have also taken little action in combating modern slavery. When correlated against GDP (PPP), these countries include Qatar, Singapore, Kuwait, Brunei, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman, Japan and South Korea.
In 2016, the Walk Free Foundation has included a measure on state-sanctioned forced labour in the government response rating. State-sanctioned forced labour is where the government forces the population, or segments of it, to work under the threat of penalty, and for which the person or population has not offered himself voluntarily. The countries that have systematically forced their population to labour include Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Belarus, China, Eritrea, North Korea, Russia, Swaziland and Vietnam.
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.09.00 PM

More Graphs Here

In 2016 About 45.8 Million People Are Slaves In 167 Countries

Simon Buxton/Anti-Slavery International


This estimate draws on data from random sample, nationally representative surveys conducted by Gallup.

What is the estimated prevalence of modern slavery country by country, and what is the absolute number by population?

The 2016 Global Slavery Index estimates that 45.8 million people are subject to some form of modern slavery in the world today. The Index presents a ranking of 167 countries based on the proportion of the population that is estimated to be in modern slavery.
The countries with the highest estimated prevalence of modern slavery by the proportion of their population are North Korea, Uzbekistan, Cambodia, India, and Qatar. In North Korea, there is pervasive evidence that government-sanctioned forced labour occurs in an extensive system of prison labour camps while North Korean women are subjected to forced marriage and commercial sexual exploitation in China and other neighbouring states. In Uzbekistan, the government continues to subject its citizens to forced labour in the annual cotton harvest.
Those countries with the highest absolute numbers of people in modern slavery are India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Uzbekistan. Several of these countries provide the low-cost labour that produces consumer goods for markets in Western Europe, Japan, North America and Australia.
The countries with the lowest estimated prevalence of modern slavery by the proportion of their population are Luxembourg, Ireland, Norway, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria, Sweden and Belgium, the United States and Canada, and Australia and New Zealand. These countries generally have more economic wealth, score higher on government response, have low levels of conflict, and are politically stable with a willingness to combat modern slavery.

VULNERABILITY

What factors explain or predict the prevalence of modern slavery?

Vulnerability to modern slavery is affected by a complex interaction of factors related to the presence or absence of protection and respect for rights, physical safety and security, access to the necessities of life such as food, water and health care, and patterns of migration, displacement and conflict. Statistical testing grouped 24 measures of vulnerability into four dimensions covering: 1) civil and political protections, 2) social health and economic rights, 3) personal security, and 4) refugee populations and conflict.
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.07.14 PM
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.07.45 PM

GOVERNMENT RESPONSE

How are governments tackling modern slavery?

In 2016, 161 countries are included in our assessment of government responses. Due to the ongoing conflict and extreme disruption to government function, we have not included ratings for Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Syria or Yemen.
Of the 161 countries:
  • 124 have criminalised human trafficking in line with the UN Trafficking Protocol.
  • 96 have National Action Plans (NAPs) to coordinate the government’s response.
  • 150 governments provide some form of service for victims of modern slavery.
The governments that have the strongest response to modern slavery are The Netherlands, the United States of America, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Australia, Portugal, Croatia, Spain, Belgium and Norway. These countries are characterised by strong political will, sufficient resources, and a strong civil society that holds governments to account.

When correlated against GDP (PPP), countries which have a relatively strong response despite fewer resources are the Philippines, Brazil, Georgia, Jamaica, Croatia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Moldova, Albania and Serbia.
Those governments taking the least action to combat modern slavery are North Korea, Iran, Eritrea, Equatorial Guinea, Hong Kong, Central African Republic, Papua New Guinea, Guinea, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. Some of these countries are characterised by government complicity, low levels of political will, or high levels of conflict and political instability.
Some wealthier and more stable countries have also taken little action in combating modern slavery. When correlated against GDP (PPP), these countries include Qatar, Singapore, Kuwait, Brunei, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman, Japan and South Korea.
In 2016, the Walk Free Foundation has included a measure on state-sanctioned forced labour in the government response rating. State-sanctioned forced labour is where the government forces the population, or segments of it, to work under the threat of penalty, and for which the person or population has not offered himself voluntarily. The countries that have systematically forced their population to labour include Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Belarus, China, Eritrea, North Korea, Russia, Swaziland and Vietnam.
Screen Shot 2016-06-01 at 2.09.00 PM

More Graphs Here



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